Smithsonian Anacostia Museum Urban Waterways Symposium 3/28; WHO/PAHO Expert Consultation Putting Health in All Policies into Practice 3/31, 4/1 DC

March 27th, 2015

The Smithsonian Anacostia Museum Urban Waterways Symposium includes panelists Dayana Molina from The City Project; Robert García, Founding Director and Counsel, The City Project, and Community Faculty, Charles Drew University; Raul Macias from Anahuak Youth Sports Association; Environmental Justice leader Vernice Miller-Travis; and Irma Muñoz from Mujeres de la Tierra.

 Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 11.43.53 AM

* * *

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 2.05.50 PM

The Pan American Organization/World Health Organization Expert Consultation “Putting Health in All Policies into Practice.” The expert consultation includes Robert García, Founding Director and Counsel, The City Project, and Community Faculty, Charles Drew University.

The objective of the conference is to provide guidance and key recommendations on the implementation of the Health in All Policies Regional Plan of Action adopted at the 53rd Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization in September of 2014.

Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Expert Consultation Putting Health in All Policies into Practice March 31-April 1 DC

March 26th, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 2.05.50 PM

The Pan American Organization/ World Health Organization Health in All Policies Expert Consultation “Putting Health in All Policies into Practice.” The expert consultation includes Robert García, Founding Director and Counsel, The City Project, and Community Faculty, Charles Drew University.

The objective of the conference is to provide guidance and key recommendations on the implementation of the Health in All Policies Regional Plan of Action adopted at the 53rd Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization in September of 2014.

Identifying Supportive Structures and the Processes and Facilitate Assessment and Engagement 3:15 PM – 3:45 PM

  • Dr. Matthew McConnell, South Australia Department of Health- Identifying Supportive Structures and Processes: The Case of Australia
  • Robert García: An Engaging and Inclusive Approach
  • Dr. Gabriel Jaime Guarin, Secretary Of Health of Medellin- HiAP at the Local Level: The Experience of Medellin
  • Moderator- Prof. Patricia Blanca Mantilla Uribe
  • Invited Expert- Prof./Sir Michael Marmot, Director of the Institude of Health Equity, University College of London, United Kingdom

What:
Health in All Policies Expert Consultation: “Putting Health in All Policies into Practice”
When:
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
9:00am to 11:30am
RSVP: March 30, 2015,  smithnar@paho.org
Where:
PAHO/WHO Regional Headquarters
525 23rd Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20037
Room “A” – Main Auditorium
To join the conference virtually:
www.livestream.com/paho (English)
www.livestream.com/opsenvivo (Spanish)

For more information on the Pan American Organization/ World Health Organization Health in All Policies Expert Consultation: “Putting Health in All Policies into Practice” click here.

See Using Civil Rights Tools to Address Health Disparities (The City Project Policy Report 2014) by Michael Rodriguez, MD, MPH; Marc Brenman; Marianne Engelman Lado, JD; and Robert García, JD.

See The Affordable Care Act and Health Justice in All Policies (The City Project 2013) by Robert García and Daphne Hsu.

 

Smithsonian Anacostia Museum Urban Waterways Symposium DC March 28 9am-4pm

March 25th, 2015

The Smithsonian Anacostia Museum Urban Waterways Symposium includes panelists Dayana Molina from The City Project; Robert García, Founding Director and Counsel, The City Project, and Community Faculty, Charles Drew University; Raul Macias from Anahuak Youth Sports Association; Environmental Justice leader Vernice Miller-Travis; and Irma Muñoz from Mujeres de la Tierra.

The symposium addresses three main themes relating to urban waterways: densely populated watersheds, urban waterways and diverse populations, and national rivers and urban development. The symposium brings together people from diverse backgrounds and agencies including nonprofit and community leaders, scholars and activists who will share their knowledge and experience about waterways management and conservation best practices.

The symposium will help to further the project’s long-standing goals of creating a cross-disciplinary dialogue among scholars, government officials, activists, and scientists, eliciting first-hand information from residents of local communities, and engaging all who are interested with on-going activities that will enable their participation in reclamation, restoration, and appropriate redevelopment of their urban waterways and their communities.

Collaborative convening partners for the symposium include Turkey Creek Community, Mississippi; Anacostia Watershed Society; The City Project, Los Angles, California; Baltimore Parks and People; 11th Street Bridge Park Project, Washington DC; Urban Waterways Federal Partnership; and the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences, the University of the District of Columbia.

 Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 11.43.53 AM
See the following articles on Urban Waters, Civic Engagement, and the L.A. River:

Recreation & Environmentalism 10:00am- 11:15am

  • Raul Macias – Founder, Anahuak Youth Sports Association, Los Angeles
  • Dayana Molina – Organizer, The City Project, Los Angeles
  • Charles “Bob” Martin – Co-Founder, Seafarers Yacht Club, Washington, DC
  • Jennifer Ney – ACBA President, Anacostia Rowing Club, Washington, DC
  • Moderator: Lee Cain – Director of Recreation, Anacostia Watershed Society, Washington, DC

Collaboration Techniques 11:30am- 12:45pm

  • Doug Siglin- Executive Director, Anacostia River Initiative, Federal City Council, Washington, DC
  • Adam Ortiz- Director for the Department of the Environment, Prince George’s County, Maryland
  • Robert García- Founding Director and Counsel, The City Project, Los Angeles
  • Reverend Nathaniel Thomas – Pastor of Forestville New Redeemer Baptist, Forestville, MD
  • Moderator: Sabine O’Hara – Dean & Director of Landgrant Programs of the new College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSE) of UDC, Washington, DC

Models in Grassroots Leadership 11:30am- 12:45pm

  • Dennis Chestnut – Executive Director, Groundwork Anacostia River, Washington, DC
  • Derrick Christopher Evans – Director, Turkey Creek Community Initiative, Mississippi
  • Inez Robb – Community Activist, Baltimore
  • Irma R. Munoz – President and CEO , Mujeres de la Tierra, Los Angeles
  • Moderator: Vernice Miller-Travis – Senior Associate, Skeo Solutions, Charlottesville, VA

Register at urbanwaterways.eventzilla.net

Use Invite Code ACMUWS2015

For more information on the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum projects click here.

CicLAvia Valley City Project Stealth Mobile Units

March 22nd, 2015

FullSizeRender

Death Penalty Dissonance NY Times Abolish the Death Penalty

March 22nd, 2015

Replace the Death Penalty with Life without Parole

Death Penalty Dissonance NY Times

Selma Is Now March 21 Celebrate the Civil Rights Revolution

March 22nd, 2015

Selma Is Now. March 21 is the 50th anniversary of the third march from Selma to Montgomery. Celebrate the Civil Rights Revolution.

Edmund Pettus Bridge is now a National Monument, part of the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail by the National Park Service.

Zinn Education Project

#tdih On March 21, 1965, thousands of people launched the third of the Selma to Montgomery marches, under the protection of federal troops. Only about 300 were allowed to walk the full journey, sleeping in fields each night. Read the Zinn Education Project article by Emilye Crosby, “Ten Things You Should Know About Selma”: http://bit.ly/1NAecs9 Here are resources recommended by Teaching for Change to teach about the voting rights struggle in Selma: http://bit.ly/1zGQTbv Photo: Marchers on the way to Montgomery as families watch from their porches (c) Stephen Somerstein (More Somerstein photos here: http://smu.gs/1ECNVnW)

'#tdih On March 21, 1965, thousands of people launched the third of the @[108333455853896:274:Selma to Montgomery marches], under the protection of federal troops. Only about 300 were allowed to walk the full journey, sleeping in fields each night. Read the @[121352639676:274:Zinn Education Project] article by Emilye Crosby, "Ten Things You Should Know About Selma": http://bit.ly/1NAecs9  Here are resources recommended by @[141844305700:274:Teaching for Change] to teach about the voting rights struggle in Selma: http://bit.ly/1zGQTbv Photo: Marchers on the way to Montgomery as families watch from their porches (c) Stephen Somerstein (More Somerstein photos here: http://smu.gs/1ECNVnW)'

International Day of Forests, President Barack Obama, & US Forest Service San Gabriel Mountains National Monument

March 20th, 2015

“To build a sustainable, climate-resilient future for all, we must invest in our world’s forests. That will take political commitment at the highest levels, smart policies, effective law enforcement, innovative partnerships and funding.” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

Since 2013, the United Nations has selected March 21 as International Forest Day.

President Barack Obama dedicated the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument in the Angeles National Forest in October 2014. President Obama spoke eloquently: “My commitment to conservation isn’t about locking away our natural treasures; it’s about working with communities to open up our glorious heritage to everybody — young and old, black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American — to make sure everybody can experience these incredible gifts.” That is the promise of the San Gabriel Mountains with green justice for all.

The late Wangari Muta Maathai received the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize for planting trees and speaking out for women.

Forests and trees serve diverse values including fun, health, and human development; climate justice and conservation; economic vitality; culture, history, art; and equal justice, democracy, and livability for all.

The US Forest Service writes about the International Day of Forests as follows.

Posted by Aysha Ghadiali, U.S. Forest Service, International Programs
Tree planting in Kfardebian, Mount Lebanon. (Photo Credit: Lebanon Reforestation Initiative)
Tree planting in Kfardebian, Mount Lebanon. (Photo Credit: Lebanon Reforestation Initiative)

Since 2013, the United Nations (UN) has selected March 21 to be the unique day that the world thinks about the importance of trees. The U.S. Forest Service celebrates the International Day of Forests by bringing awareness about our involvement with international partners to continue to protect the health of forest worldwide.

For instance in the Middle Eastern and Mediterranean country of Lebanon, the power of one symbolic cedar tree, the image on the country’s flag, captures the promise and strength of an entire nation.

The decline of Lebanon’s forests by more than 35 percent over the last 50 years to the current rate of approximately 13 percent land cover poses potentially grave threats to national identity, water security, and rural and urban livelihoods. And climate change exacerbates the effects of deforestation, hastening desertification. As a result, the Lebanese government deemed reforestation a national priority.

The Lebanon Reforestation Initiative, a project funded by the USAID and implemented by the U.S. Forest Service, is undertaking an ambitious program of sustainable forestry practices and wildfire management in economically depressed and environmentally degraded regions of Lebanon.

After just four years the initiative has transformed not only the way native trees are grown and planted through successful community-based models, but the project has demonstrated how the entry point of landscape restoration offers significant co-benefits of rural economic development, livelihood support, and enhanced social cohesion. The project has planted more than half-a-million native tree species on more than 700 hectares throughout all regions of Lebanon.

Survival rates of planted tree seedlings have dramatically improved on average between 70-90 percent after three years, compared with a previous national average of about 25 percent.

The initiative, implemented on the ground by its Lebanese staff, offers an array of crosscutting socio-economic benefits in underserved areas and in all types of diverse sectarian communities, especially those hit hardest by the Syrian refugee crisis. Taken together, these expected benefits constitute a brighter future for Lebanon, for its forested watersheds and for the continued harmony of communities dependent upon their natural resources.

Cedar Trees in Tannourine, Cedars Forest Nature Reserve, North Lebanon.
Cedar Trees in Tannourine, Cedars Forest Nature Reserve, North

- See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2015/03/20/the-us-forest-service-and-international-day-of-forests/#sthash.mPTHo6gc.dpuf

Environmental Justice Leaders Call for Diversifying Funding of People of Color NGOs, Civil Rights Compliance

March 17th, 2015

The City Project joins with Dr. Robert D. Bullard and other environmental justice leaders in calling for greater diversity in mainstream environmental organizations, diversifying funding for people of color NGOs, and compliance with civil rights requirements by mainstream environmental organizations.

diversity_green_groups

The important 2014 “The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations” report from Green 2.0 (prepared by University of Michigan environmental justice scholar Dorceta Taylor) once again shone the national spotlight back on the whiteness of Green Groups. This lack of diversity in mainstream environmental organizations has received much media attention in recent months—with emphasis on getting more people of color inside mostly white nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Diversifying white NGOs is only part of the solution. Diversifying funding to people of color and indigenous environmental organizations and institutions must be given equal weight in addressing current and future environmental challenges going forward as we transition to a majority people of color nation in the next thirty years. Children of color already make up over half of the under-5 age group in the country.

The 2012 Cultivating the Grassroots report from the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy concluded that the current environmental funding strategy is not winning and that this outcome would not likely change significantly until philanthropy begins targeting funding at communities most impacted by environmental harms. The NCRP offered a four-point roadmap for “funding the grassroots to win:”

  • Fund work that benefits communities of the future
  • Invest 25 percent of grant dollars in grassroots action
  • Build supportive infrastructure
  • Take the long view, prepare for tipping points

It is no surprise to learn environmental justice organizations and grassroots leaders from around the country fully support and endorse the NCRP recommendations. Earlier this month, a group of environmental leaders prepared a letter to Green 2.0, “Statement by Environmental Justice Leaders on Green 2.0: Diversifying Mainstream Environmental Organizations, Diversifying Funding for Environmental Justice Organizations, and Complying with Civil Rights Laws” (March 4, 2015). And finally, providing unrestricted long-term support to grass-roots organizing groups pushing for racial justice is perhaps the most important thing grant makers can do, according Aaron Dorfman, executive director of NCRP. To view the full text of the EJ leaders’ statement click here.

How White Foundation Leaders Can Promote Racial Justice Chronicle of Philanthropy

March 16th, 2015

White people working in philanthropy are an important source of funding for nonprofits helping to organize on-the-ground efforts across the country, but it is essential that they take an active role, too. The future of our nation depends on our building a society that ensures everyone has an opportunity to thrive, regardless of race. Philanthropy has an important role to play in the coming months and years to help the movement bring about lasting progress.

Here are five simple steps that white leaders can take to promote racial justice:

Become educated about the issues. . . .

Link racial justice to your foundation’s mission. . . .

Hire and promote blacks, Hispanics, and other people of color for staff and trustee positions. . . . Building a diverse team of staff and trustees isn’t sufficient, however. . . .

Take a stand. One of the most important things you can do is put your personal reputation and your institution’s reputational capital on the line while standing strong for policies that promote racial justice. . . .

Provide unrestricted long-term support to grass-roots organizing groups. [Offering flexible aid to organizing groups pushing for racial justice is perhaps the most important thing grant makers can do.]

Those are just a few examples of what is possible when foundations invest for the long term in grass-roots organizing.

This fight for racial justice is not a flash-in-the-pan moment. It’s a movement. Serious systemic change is a possibility. . . .

Aaron Dorfman is executive director of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy. Read this complete article in the Chronicle of Philanthropy. [Original emphasis in bold; bracketed emphasis added.]

Physical Education MAP and Checklist LA County Health Department. Quality Physical Education Is a Right.

March 13th, 2015

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, working with education and civil rights advocates, provides materials to support physical education in all California public schools. The materials listed below provide a four-step process for school districts and community leaders to ensure compliance with physical education and civil rights requirements and best practices. Below step four is a shorter guide for schools, a short guide for parents in English, and el Guía para Padres en Español.

Step One: Physical Education Checklist

The Physical Education Checklist is designed for teachers, administrators, and community leaders to evaluate their school district’s physical education policies and programs. The checklist summarizes education and civil rights requirements, best practices, and other recommendations for physical education. This checklist can help schools develop an action plan to highlight strengths and address gaps in their physical education programs. The writing committee includes experts from the Los Angeles Unified School District, The City Project, L.A. County Department of Public Health, Los Angeles County Office of Education, and the California Center for Excellence in Physical Education.

Step Two: The Physical Education MAP (Model Action Plan)

The Physical Education MAP summarizes specific steps that need to be taken to achieve compliance. This includes the timeframe, action required, roles and responsibilities, implementation status, and current progress towards each action item.

Step Three: Physical Education Policy

The draft Physical Education Policy can be adapted to establish the school district’s long-term course of action.

Step Four: School Board Physical Education Resolution

The School Board can adapt the draft Physical Education Resolution to demonstrate that the district takes the right to physical education seriously, and that a compliance plan is in place.

Download the policy brief Physical Education for All California Public School Students (The City Project 2015).

physical education schools

Click here for a short physical education guide for schools

educacion fisica 2015

Click here to download a short Parent’s Guide in English / Siga este enláce por el Guía para Padres en Español

Additional tools and resources are available at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health website.