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Stay Calm and Save Our Coast for All StatusOfExecutiveDirector@coastal.ca.gov

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“We’ve made tremendous progress under Dr. Lester,” said lawyer Robert Garcia of the City Project, which has fought for beach access in Malibu and other areas where private property owners have used guards, bogus signs and parking restrictions to keep citizens off public beaches. “The beach belongs to everybody. Not just the rich and famous and the mainstream enviros.” Steve Lopez, L.A. Times.

Read the letter from diverse allies to Steve Kinsey, Chair of the California Coastal Commission, and elected state leaders. En español.

Don’t defang coastal panel Sacramento Bee Robert García En español.

Keeping California’s Beaches Open for All NRPA Robert García.

Why the California Coastal Commission needs Charles Lester Press-Telegram Cruz Bustamante.

Sadly, the commissioners attempting to fire Dr. Lester are the ones with the worst environmental and social justice voting records.” San Jose Mercury News Huey D. Johnson, former California Secretary of Natural Resources

To add your voice, write to StatusOfExecutiveDirector@coastal.ca.gov.

Speak up at the Coastal Commission hearing February 10, 2016.

Robert García and Erica Flores Baltodano, Free the Beach! Public Access, Equal Justice, and the California Coast, 2 Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 143 (2005).

NY Times América en Español. Todos somos Americanos.

Welcome to the New York Times in Spanish. It’s about time. And it’s not only about Central and South America and Spain. It’s about the Latino and Hispanic diaspora in the U.S. too.

Bien venidos a los New York Times en Español. Ya era timpo. Y no se trata solo de Centro América, Sud América, y España si no que la diáspora Latina en los EE.UU. tambien. NY Times América en Español. Todos somos Americanos.

Apreciados lectores

Hoy tengo el placer de darles la bienvenida a The New York Times en Español, una página diseñada para que la disfruten desde sus computadoras y teléfonos móviles. Aquí encontrarán una selección de lo mejor del New York Times traducido al español y también artículos originales.

Nuestra oferta incluirá artículos relevantes para América Latina, como esta historia, escrita por nuestro corresponsal en México, Azam Ahmed, quien siguió a un grupo de migrantes centroamericanos en su peligrosa y larga travesía para llegar a Estados Unidos. También tendremos notas de análisis como la de nuestro columnista económico Eduardo Porter, quien trata de explicar qué consecuencias tendrá un dólar más fuerte en la economía global. También queremos ser parte de su día a día, por lo que incluiremos artículos sobre cómo lograr que sus hijos sean más creativos, qué tipo de ejercicios recomiendan los expertos y también, por qué no, uno que otro consejo sobre el difícil mundo del amor. Finalmente, prometemos convertirnos en su guía para seguir las elecciones en Estados Unidos (que pueden confundir a cualquiera) con artículos originales como esta nota para entender el caucus de Iowa.

Hemos armado un fantástico equipo con periodistas de varios lugares de América Latina y España, y nuestra misión es ofrecerles periodismo de alta calidad todos los días. Por favor suscríbanse a nuestro Boletín, y síganos en Twitter y Facebook.

Espero que disfruten nuestra página y la sientan como propia. Nos encantará recibir sus preguntas, opiniones y sugerencias, así que, por favor, escríbannos a ayuda@nytimes.com.

Sinceramente,
Lydia Polgreen

Editora adjunta de Internacional de The New York Times

Smithsonian_Latino_Virtual_Museum

California coast in grave danger if Coastal Commission coup succeeds Huey Johnson

“California’s coast is facing unprecedented threats, from superstorms and sea level rise to ever more aggressive lobbyists for proposed mega mansions and industrial facilities. . . .

“Citizens are coming to [Coastal Commission Executive Director Charles] Lester’s defense. In the past week, more than 14,000 submitted comments on the attempted coup. . . .

“In addition, a bipartisan group of 36 former coastal commissioners wrote to current Chair Steve Kinsey to express support for Dr. Lester. Sixteen state legislators also sent a letter to Brown urging him to ‘weigh in with support to maintain the independence of the California Coastal Program staff and retain Dr. Charles Lester as its respected and trusted leader.’

“Sadly, the commissioners attempting to fire Dr. Lester are the ones with the worst environmental and social justice voting records.”

Read the complete op/ed by Huey D. Johnson, former California Secretary of Natural Resources, in the San Jose Mercury News . . .

To add your voice, write to StatusOfExecutiveDirector@coastal.ca.gov.

Speak up at the Coastal Commission hearing February 10, 2016.

Read the letter from diverse allies to Steve Kinsey, Chair of the California Coastal Commission, and elected state leaders. En español.

Huey Johnson, Resource Renewal Institute, and Robert Garcia at The City Project
Huey Johnson, Resource Renewal Institute, and The City Project’s Robert García

 

“We’ve made tremendous progress under Dr. Lester,” said lawyer Robert Garcia of the City Project, which has fought for beach access in Malibu and other areas where private property owners have used guards, bogus signs and parking restrictions to keep citizens off public beaches. “The beach belongs to everybody. Not just the rich and famous and the mainstream enviros.” Steve Lopez, L.A. Times.

Read the letter from diverse allies to Steve Kinsey, Chair of the California Coastal Commission, and elected state leaders. En español.

Don’t defang coastal panel Sacramento Bee Robert García En español.

Keeping California’s Beaches Open for All NRPA Robert García.

Why the California Coastal Commission needs Charles Lester Press-Telegram Cruz Bustamante.

Erica Flores Baltodano to speak for The City Project and allies at CA Coastal Commission hearing Feb 10

Attorney Erica Flores Baltodano will present remarks for The City Project and diverse allies at the California Coastal Commission hearing in Morro Bay on coastal access for all, environmental and climate justice, transparency in government, and a strong and independent Commission staff. Erica is a preeminent civil rights and environmental justice attorney on the Central Coast, and author of Free the Beach! in the Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. She is a member of The City Project’s National Advisory Council and former Assistant Director & Counsel, where she served for 8 years. She is a founding partner of Baltodano & Baltodano LLP, a law firm with offices in San Luis Obispo and Los Angeles. Erica is the 2002 recipient of UC Berkeley Law School’s prestigious Francine Diaz Memorial Award for her steadfast commitment to public interest law. Erica is a leading authority on coastal access, climate, environmental justice, and the public trust doctrine. She publishes a recurring column Mommy Esquire in the San Luis Obispo County Bar Association’s Bar Bulletin.

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Erica at Morro Bay.

“We’ve made tremendous progress under Dr. Lester,” said lawyer Robert Garcia of the City Project, which has fought for beach access in Malibu and other areas where private property owners have used guards, bogus signs and parking restrictions to keep citizens off public beaches. “The beach belongs to everybody. Not just the rich and famous and the mainstream enviros.” Steve Lopez, L.A. Times.

Read the letter from diverse allies to Steve Kinsey, Chair of the California Coastal Commission, and elected state leaders. En español.

Don’t defang coastal panel Sacramento Bee Robert García En español.

Keeping California’s Beaches Open for All NRPA Robert García.

Why the California Coastal Commission needs Charles Lester Press-Telegram Cruz Bustamante. 

Speak up at the Coastal Commission hearing February 10, 2016.

Why the California Coastal Commission needs Charles Lester: Cruz Bustamante

By Cruz Bustamante

POSTED: 02/05/16, 2:00 PM PST | Press-Telegram Opinion

Just days before I was elected speaker of the California Assembly, I took my children to the coast to see its beaches, sundown and all its splendor. We talked about the coast and I promised them that I would do all that I could to keep it as pristine as I could for them and their children to enjoy.

Representing the Central Valley, I understand firsthand the importance of public beaches to inland and rural populations, underserved communities and people of color. When it hits the mid-90s and above during our summer months, families load up the station wagon and head to the coast.

Many areas in the Valley, Inland Empire, Northern California, as well as many inner city communities, don’t have direct access to parks and open spaces, and have always relied on our state’s greatest public asset — our magnificent coast.

While it’s easy to take public beach access for granted, we shouldn’t. Even in 2016, coastal and beach access is routinely and illegally denied to the working class and communities of color simply seeking to enjoy nature.

One state agency, the California Coastal Commission, has been charged for 40 years with the goal of both protecting the coast and providing the widest possible public access for all state residents and visitors.

As speaker of the Assembly in the mid-1990s, I had the responsibility of appointing four members to the Coastal Commission and am proud to say that my appointees helped create a pro-environmental legacy for our state. The decisions we make about our natural resources, like the decisions we make about public education and social justice, reflect who we are as Californians and the future we want to leave for our children.

In just the past few years, under the leadership of Executive Director Charles Lester, the Coastal Commission has doubled down on public access issues, working hard to open up unlawfully closed access to the coast and defending the rights of the public to enjoy the beach. It has played a part in groundbreaking discussions meant to increase public access for all our residents, not just those who can afford to live near our greatest public asset.

In reading the media accounts about the management issues mentioned as grounds for the possible termination of Lester, I find that a key voice is [not being heard]. Environmental justice advocates should be greatly concerned about losing important gains to public coastal access under Lester’s leadership. Our state’s diversity leadership, whose community’s residents have the most to lose, must champion the continuance of the collaborative work to ensure all Californians enjoy our beaches.

Under Lester’s leadership, environmental and social justice, civil rights, education and public health advocates have found a willing and committed partner in the Coastal Commission to work in behalf of the public interest. It is essential to retain the independence of the California Coastal Commission and to provide Lester and the commission staff the authority to deal with the pressing issues facing our coast.

The coast belongs to all Californians — first generation to multi-generation. Inland to coastal. A strong Coastal Commission ensures all Californians’ the right to the simple, but all important, pleasure of a day at the beach with their families or friends.

Cruz Bustamante is the former California lieutenant governor.

30952 Broad Beach Road

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“We’ve made tremendous progress under Dr. Lester,” said lawyer Robert Garcia of the City Project, which has fought for beach access in Malibu and other areas where private property owners have used guards, bogus signs and parking restrictions to keep citizens off public beaches. “The beach belongs to everybody. Not just the rich and famous and the mainstream enviros.” Steve Lopez, L.A. Times.

Don’t defang coastal panel Sacramento Bee Robert García En español.

Read the letter from diverse allies to Steve Kinsey, Chair of the California Coastal Commission, and elected state leaders. En español.

Keeping California’s Beaches Open for All NRPA Robert García.

Speak up at the Coastal Commission hearing February 10, 2016.

The ugly face of privatizing public beaches

A Malibu resident issues a vitriolic attack demanding that the city council cut off public access to public lands in the coastal zone: “As God is my witness, I will recall every single person I can that votes the wrong way . . . . I grew up in Florida in a resort city. This [Malibu] looks like the most hellacious city I’ve ever seen in my life. You’ve told me, [Councilman] Barovsky, that you were going to clean up this, this illegal slave operation we have out in front of, of the city hall. We don’t even know if they’re illegal or not. We don’t know who could have been starting fires anywhere.”

Reflecting a sense of entitlement Malibu residents applauded this acerbic message, andt tried to drown out advocates who spoke up for public access for all in 2008. This reflects the privatiization and racialization of beach access. What do Latinos working at city hall have to do with beach access? Slavery? A local fire? The police showed Malibu teens partying in the hills started the fire.

“We’ve made tremendous progress under Dr. Lester,” said lawyer Robert Garcia of the City Project, which has fought for beach access in Malibu and other areas where private property owners have used guards, bogus signs and parking restrictions to keep citizens off public beaches. “The beach belongs to everybody. Not just the rich and famous and the mainstream enviros.” Steve Lopez, L.A. Times.

Don’t defang coastal panel Sacramento Bee Robert García En español.

Read the letter from diverse allies to Steve Kinsey, Chair of the California Coastal Commission, and elected state leaders. En español.

Speak up at the Coastal Commission hearing February 10, 2016.

Paul Revere Williams “…black people won’t have the money to hire you – and white people won’t hire you because you’re black.” #WeAreLA

“…black people won’t have the money to hire you – and white people won’t hire you because you’re black.”

Over 50 years, Paul Revere Williams designed some of L.A.’s best-known structures: the Theme Building at LAX, Saks Fifth Avenue in Beverly Hills and mansions galore. But Williams wasn’t welcome inside some of his creations, because he was African American. Read on for more about him and see some of his work on [the new L.A. Times] Tumblr blog #WeAreLA.

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#WeAreLA

Keeping California’s Beaches Open For All NRPA Robert Garcia

by Robert García |
Open Space NRPA National Recreation and Park Association
Posted on February 1, 2016
2.1.16_blog_Garcia_coast
Native American, environmental justice and beach advocates saved the sacred site of Panhe and San Onofre State Beach from a toll road.

While California has the largest and most diverse system of state parks and cultural sites in the nation, most parks are not where most people are – especially in urban areas like Los Angeles where lower income neighborhoods tend to be “park poor” and there are disparities in access to open space based on race, ethnicity and poverty. The beach helps fill this void – it is where people of all ages, cultures and incomes come together with family, friends and nature. For 40 years, the California Coastal Act has helped ensure beach access is open to all.

California voters created an independent panel to protect the coast and defend public access. The Coastal Commission is charged with the care of 1,100 miles of beaches and bluffs, from Tijuana Slough in San Diego north to Tolowa Dunes near Oregon. With a growing and increasingly diverse state population, some of the highest property values in the nation, intense development pressure, and rising seas due to climate change, the Coastal Commission’s charge isn’t easy.

Some Californians take beach access for granted—after all, it was a condition of California joining the Union that beaches remain open for all—but time and time again developers and oceanfront property owners have tried to lock out the public and keep the beach for themselves. We’ve seen this in Malibu, which tried to keep people out through phony “private beach” signs. We’ve seen it in Newport Beach, where a councilman opposed growing grass at the beach because “with grass we usually get Mexicans” who stay all day. Everyone loses when fences, “no trespassing” signs, and over-development come between the people and beaches that are free for all to use. But people of color and low-income communities suffer first and worst.

2.1.16_blog_Garcia_fight

Civil rights advocates fighting for equal access to the beach in 1964 in St. Augustine, Florida. We’re still fighting 52 years later in California.

With such high stakes, the Coastal Commission is often in the crosshairs of big money politics. Twice the Commission has faced high profile efforts to oust executive directors who defended public access. In 1996, a developer-backed effort to fire then executive director Peter Douglas, author of the Coastal Act, was beaten back by people rising up in his support.

A similar effort is now underway to oust Executive Director Charles Lester who has a strong record of promoting public access to the beach, with a public hearing set for February 10. A diverse alliance of over 80 social justice and environmental groups are organizing to support transparency in government, independence for the staff, and equal access for all.

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Roosevelt elk at Sinkyone State Park and the Lost Coast Wilderness.

California’s world famous beaches must remain open to all, not the exclusive province of the rich and famous. A healthy environment is not a luxury. Environmental justice is a civil and human right. Courts from California to Michigan, New Jersey and Connecticut have upheld public access to the beach. NRPA’s three pillars are conservation, health and wellness, and social equity. I encourage the parks community to take action to support Dr. Charles Lester as Executive Director of the Coastal Commission – he shares our values, acts on behalf of all Californians and deserves our support. Please email letters by Feb. 5 to: StatusOfExecutiveDirector@coastal.ca.gov and let your voice be heard!

Robert García is the Founding Director and Counsel of The City Project.

San Onofre and Sinkyone photos credit The City Project / Robert García

* * *

“We’ve made tremendous progress under Dr. Lester,” said lawyer Robert Garcia of the City Project, which has fought for beach access in Malibu and other areas where private property owners have used guards, bogus signs and parking restrictions to keep citizens off public beaches. “The beach belongs to everybody. Not just the rich and famous and the mainstream enviros.” Steve Lopez, L.A. Times.

Don’t defang coastal panel Sacramento Bee Robert García En español.

Read the letter from diverse allies to Steve Kinsey, Chair of the California Coastal Commission, and elected state leaders. En español.

Speak up at the Coastal Commission hearing February 10, 2016.

No quitar los colmillos del panel costera Sacramento Bee Robert Garcia

En inglés

28 de enero de 2016

El director ejecutivo de la Comisión podría ser destituido por sus integrantes a favor del desarrollo.

Destituir a Charles Lester sería un duro golpe a la protección costera cuando se necesita más que nunca.

El gobernador Brown y los líderes del Congreso deben apoyarlo.

The California Coastal Commission in October narrowly approved a sand-replenishment project near multimillion-dollar homes along Broad Beach in Malibu.

En octubre, la Comisión Costera de California aprobó por un pequeño margen, un proyecto de reposición de arena cerca de viviendas valuadas en millones de dólares a lo largo de Broad Beach en Malibú. Nick Ut, The Associated Press

Por Robert Garcia, contribución especial para el Sacramento Bee

Las playas y la costa forman parte de los tesoros naturales predilectos de California, atrayendo a millones de visitantes a lugares como el parque estatal Sinkyone Wilderness y a la meca del surf en el sur de California. Durante mucho tiempo, activistas en temas ambientales, derechos civiles y de salud han luchado por mantener el acceso gratuito a las playas para todos, incluso frente al cambio climático, a los desarrolladores inmobiliarios y codiciosos propietarios de viviendas con vista al mar, los cuales representan una amenaza para el acceso público.

Charles Lester y el personal a su cargo en la Comisión Costera de California han estado haciendo su trabajo para proteger la costa. Como resultado de ello, el trabajo de Lester se ve amenazado por acosadores que buscan destituirlo sin justificación. Exhortamos al gobernador Jerry Brown, al presidente del Senado Kevin de León y al presidente de la Asamblea Toni Atkins a respaldar al Dr. Lester para el bien público.

Robert Garcia

Robert Garcia

El cambio climático está teniendo como consecuencia el aumento del nivel del mar, la acidificación del océano y haciendo más vulnerables a todas nuestras comunidades y recursos costeros. La destitución de Lester minaría la protección de las costas cuando se necesita más que nunca.

Una condición para la adhesión de California a la Unión fue que las playas mantuvieran su carácter público. Sin embargo, durante muchos años del siglo XX, el acceso a una gran parte de la costa de California estuvo prohibido para las personas de color mediante restricciones discriminatorias relacionadas con la vivienda. Aunque las prohibiciones por cuestiones raciales han quedad en el pasado, desafortunadamente aún persisten acciones para evitar que la población de escasos recursos, incluyendo a muchas personas de color, disfrute de las playas públicas.

Desde su creación en 1976, la Comisión ha encabezado las acciones de defensa del acceso público. En 2002, adoptó un plan para Malibú, el cual concede acceso a la playa al tiempo que garantiza un trato justo para las personas de todos los grupos étnicos, cultura y nivel de ingresos. En 2014, la Comisión respondió a las quejas de los ciudadanos y grupos locales, como el Black Surfers Collective, en relación a ciertas acciones para bloquear el acceso a Paradise Cove, un sitio popular de surf. El dueño de una propiedad estaba tratando de prohibir el acceso a quién él veía como “gentuza” mediante la instalación de letreros que indicaban “prohibido surfear”, el cobro de cuotas y cerrando con llave una reja. La Comisión ordenó retirar los letreros y desmontar la reja.

Cerca de Half Moon Bay, el personal de la Comisión ha estado trabajando para restaurar el acceso a Martins Beach, un popular destino que las familias han disfrutado durante años, después de que el nuevo dueño de la propiedad cerrara la carretera de acceso. Lester escribió, “La Comisión cuenta con un largo historial de proteger, para todas las personas, el acceso público y los recursos recreativos que son fundamentales, no sólo para nuestra economía sino para nuestro estilo de vida”.

En el caso reciente de Broad Beach en Malibú, Lester recomendó que se diseñara un proyecto masivo de blindaje de la playa diseñado para reforzar algunos de los inmuebles más caros del estado para asegurar la continuidad de acceso a la playa. Cuando los propietarios se opusieron, la Comisión aprobó el proyecto sin garantizar el acceso público, a pesar de que su política de 2015 en relación al nivel del mar indica que las decisiones que se tomen en la planificación costera deben considerar a las comunidades de escasos recursos.

Si Broad Beach es un indicio, el futuro del acceso a las playas públicas puede estar en riesgo. A medida que los niveles del mar aumentan, los dueños de dichas propiedades continuarán buscando construir diques y otras estructuras a expensas de las playas públicas.

Es esencial que el acceso a nuestras playas se mantenga abierto para todas las personas, no sólo para los ricos y famosos. Por eso, hago un llamado a los miembros de la Comisión para que detengan los intentos de destituir a Lester y los exhorto en su lugar a trabajar con él para proteger nuestra costa.

Robert García es director fundador y abogado de The City Project, un grupo de derechos civiles con sede en Los Ángeles, que aboga por la igualdad de acceso a las playas. Se le puede contactar a través del correo rgarcia@cityprojectca.org.

Traducción Alianza Fronteriza de Filantropía / U.S.-Mexico Border Philanthropy Partnership

[Siga este enlace para obtener la carta de diversos aliados trabajando para ampliar el acceso público a la costa de California.]

Participe el 10 de Febrero, 2016, en Morro Bay.

The Politics of Building Environments: Environmental Racism, Health, and South LA, Feb 4 6-8:30 pm, The City Project and CDU

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